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Posted on January 2, 2020

Remember that tote bag you got when you made a donation to public radio? Did you know that the IRS cares about the value of that bag? According to the IRS, if something of value is given to a donor in exchange for the donation (a “quid pro quo”), then the donor can only take a tax deduction for the amount of the donation less the value of the item given. But the IRS makes an exception to this requirement if the item is considered a “low cost article”. If the donor only receives a low-cost article (like a tote bag) in exchange for a donation, then the donor can deduct the full value of the donation. What is a “low-cost article” depends upon the amount of the donation and the cost of the article itself. The IRS adjusts these amounts each year for inflation.