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Posted on February 24, 2017

When you applied for 501(c)(3) status for your organization, you had to tell the IRS what charitable services you were going to provide, whom you would serve and whether you planned to charge fees (which had to be reasonable). The IRS granted 501(c)(3) status to your organization based on that information. Now in the age of buzz words like “self-sustaining” and “diversification of income”, there are voices encouraging charities to act more like businesses and expand their income-generating activities. What if your organization now wants to generate income by providing the same services but to a different group of people? Or by providing slightly different services? And how do you determine whether your fees are reasonable? During this webcast, we will explore how charitable 501(c)(3)s can charge fees for services while remaining charitable.

Click here to view the webcast.