The materials in our Resources section are for informational purposes only, without any representation that they are accurate or complete. These publications do not constitute legal advice and do not create an attorney-client relationship between the reader and any other person, nor are they an offer to create such a relationship. These publications are current as of the date written, but laws change over time and vary from state to state. As a result, the information presented here may not be timely and/or appropriate for any state not specifically addressed in a publication. Consult an attorney if you have questions regarding the content of any publication.

Social Enterprise

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Posted on February 24, 2017

When you applied for 501(c)(3) status for your organization, you had to tell the IRS what charitable services you were going to provide, whom you would serve and whether you planned to charge fees (which had to be reasonable). The IRS granted 501(c)(3) status to your organization based on that information. Now in the age of buzz words like “self-sustaining” and “diversification of income”, there are voices encouraging charities to act more like businesses and expand their income-generating activities. What if your organization now wants to generate income by providing the same services but to a different group of people? Or by providing slightly different services? And how do you determine whether your fees are reasonable? During this webcast, we will explore how charitable 501(c)(3)s can charge fees for services while remaining charitable.

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Posted on May 13, 2016

The new buzz word in the nonprofit §501(c)(3) sector seems to be “self-sustaining.” Boards, foundations, and other stakeholders are asking how nonprofit §501(c)(3)’s can generate income and become self-sustaining. The goal of this webcast is to help nonprofits understand the potential risks of selling goods or services and to provide insights into options for doing so without jeopardizing their tax-exempt status.

Speaker: Robyn Miller, Corporate/Tax Counsel, Pro Bono Partnership of Atlanta

Please click here to view the webcast.

Posted on April 25, 2016

In 1982, Paul Newman founded Newman’s Own, a for-profit corporation created to sell food products and donate 100% of the profits to charity. What started as a boutique operation has grown into an international business with over $350 million in revenues. Many people consider Paul Newman to be one of the original pioneers in the area of social enterprise, and now others are following his lead by applying business strategies to achieve social purposes. The social enterprise model has become increasingly popular and successful over the past few decades, but what should such an entity look like? During this webcast, our speaker will discuss the three common corporate forms for social enterprise activities and the pros and cons of using each.

Speaker: Robyn Miller, Corporate/Tax Counsel, Pro Bono Partnership of Atlanta

Please click here to view webcast.